Roebling Center Buildings. Trenton, NJ.

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Roebling Center Building 101, which was built in 1917, was where light- and medium-gauge wire rope for aircraft, elevator cables and submarine netting was spun.   Cables that were used in Charles Lindbergh’s The Spirit of St. Louis were made inside the building.

John Roebling, civil engineer and designer of bridges such as the Brooklyn Bridge, moved his family to Trenton, New Jersey, in 1848, where he established a business manufacturing twisted wire cable for a wide variety of engineering applications. This successful business continued as the John A. Roebling’s Sons Company through the mid-twentieth century.

After decades of sitting vacant, Building 101 and the rest of the old factory buildings off of Route 129 in Trenton started renovations into lofts, apartments, and office spaces in March of 2016.

To learn more about Historic Roebling, visit the Roebling Museum.

Photographed March 2016.

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